East villager who spends his free time in Montauk. Posting pics of my kids and occasionally musing about entrepreneurship, tech and social media.

Some black-and-white pics from our Montauk vacay last month. The surf shots are of some local guys taking advantage of the swell from Cristobal.

(For some reason it seems like I lost a lot of resolution when these were uploaded to Tumblr.)

The view from my bedroom tonight #neverforget #nyc
The view from my bedroom tonight #neverforget #nyc

The view from my bedroom tonight #neverforget #nyc

This child enjoys the beach #happylaborday #mtk
This child enjoys the beach #happylaborday #mtk

This child enjoys the beach #happylaborday #mtk

I see countless heroin addicts and homeless people every day and feel nothing.  Not sympathy.  Not sadness. Not even condemnation. A TMZ-watermarked video of domestic violence runs on a loop on every news channel and it has zero effect on me. Shit, even the beheadings of innocent Americans are losing some of their sting. Does all this mean I’m heartless? Or at a minimum, completely desensitized?
Maybe.
Engine Company #5 sits next door to my kid’s school. This morning I saw complete strangers greet firemen with pats on the back, hugs and bouquets of flowers. They stood there, on this fateful and solemn anniversary, with a sense of pride and duty that thickened the air around them. I couldn’t see it, but I could feel it.
From the hall outside my kid’s class I watched through a small window in the door as her teacher patiently negotiated a dispute over crayons like it was an Israeli-Palestinian peace treaty. Her gentleness and serenity was touching. I couldn’t see it, but I felt something.
I left school and headed to work. From 14th street to 23rd street I followed a blind man with a Yellow Labrador guide dog wearing a sign that said, “Please don’t pet me. I’m working.” And he was working. Diligently. The streets of New York are unkind, even to the most able-bodied. And here was this dog with his blind owner, completely committed, as a team, to one cause: getting from Point A to Point B. The connection between the two and their uncompromising commitment to succeed was moving. I couldn’t see it, but there was most definitely a feeling, a twinge, that I felt in my gut.
My numbness to atrocities is unfortunate. I want to care. I really do. I wish I could bring it back in the way you rub your foot when it has fallen asleep. But it’s just so hard when I have so many other things to care about, like the bravery of heroes, the kindness of caregivers, and the loyalty of canines.

Never stop appreciating. Never stop loving. And most importantly, Never Forget.
I see countless heroin addicts and homeless people every day and feel nothing.  Not sympathy.  Not sadness. Not even condemnation. A TMZ-watermarked video of domestic violence runs on a loop on every news channel and it has zero effect on me. Shit, even the beheadings of innocent Americans are losing some of their sting. Does all this mean I’m heartless? Or at a minimum, completely desensitized?
Maybe.
Engine Company #5 sits next door to my kid’s school. This morning I saw complete strangers greet firemen with pats on the back, hugs and bouquets of flowers. They stood there, on this fateful and solemn anniversary, with a sense of pride and duty that thickened the air around them. I couldn’t see it, but I could feel it.
From the hall outside my kid’s class I watched through a small window in the door as her teacher patiently negotiated a dispute over crayons like it was an Israeli-Palestinian peace treaty. Her gentleness and serenity was touching. I couldn’t see it, but I felt something.
I left school and headed to work. From 14th street to 23rd street I followed a blind man with a Yellow Labrador guide dog wearing a sign that said, “Please don’t pet me. I’m working.” And he was working. Diligently. The streets of New York are unkind, even to the most able-bodied. And here was this dog with his blind owner, completely committed, as a team, to one cause: getting from Point A to Point B. The connection between the two and their uncompromising commitment to succeed was moving. I couldn’t see it, but there was most definitely a feeling, a twinge, that I felt in my gut.
My numbness to atrocities is unfortunate. I want to care. I really do. I wish I could bring it back in the way you rub your foot when it has fallen asleep. But it’s just so hard when I have so many other things to care about, like the bravery of heroes, the kindness of caregivers, and the loyalty of canines.

Never stop appreciating. Never stop loving. And most importantly, Never Forget.

I see countless heroin addicts and homeless people every day and feel nothing.  Not sympathy.  Not sadness. Not even condemnation. A TMZ-watermarked video of domestic violence runs on a loop on every news channel and it has zero effect on me. Shit, even the beheadings of innocent Americans are losing some of their sting. Does all this mean I’m heartless? Or at a minimum, completely desensitized?

Maybe.

Engine Company #5 sits next door to my kid’s school. This morning I saw complete strangers greet firemen with pats on the back, hugs and bouquets of flowers. They stood there, on this fateful and solemn anniversary, with a sense of pride and duty that thickened the air around them. I couldn’t see it, but I could feel it.

From the hall outside my kid’s class I watched through a small window in the door as her teacher patiently negotiated a dispute over crayons like it was an Israeli-Palestinian peace treaty. Her gentleness and serenity was touching. I couldn’t see it, but I felt something.

I left school and headed to work. From 14th street to 23rd street I followed a blind man with a Yellow Labrador guide dog wearing a sign that said, “Please don’t pet me. I’m working.” And he was working. Diligently. The streets of New York are unkind, even to the most able-bodied. And here was this dog with his blind owner, completely committed, as a team, to one cause: getting from Point A to Point B. The connection between the two and their uncompromising commitment to succeed was moving. I couldn’t see it, but there was most definitely a feeling, a twinge, that I felt in my gut.

My numbness to atrocities is unfortunate. I want to care. I really do. I wish I could bring it back in the way you rub your foot when it has fallen asleep. But it’s just so hard when I have so many other things to care about, like the bravery of heroes, the kindness of caregivers, and the loyalty of canines.

Never stop appreciating. Never stop loving. And most importantly, Never Forget.

You’re not very good at surfboarding, papa
- Lola Hantz
digithoughts:

Google I/O keynote round-up
There was a lot of interesting news and info coming out of today’s Google I/O event. In short, Google is trying hard to play an increasing part of our lives - on the web, in our computers, phones, watches, glasses, TVs and even in our cars.
Android One is a Google Play Edition program for cheap phones. Cheap phones with clean Android sounds nice.
Android TV is official. Is the third time a charm for Android to get into our living rooms? With increased attention to gaming this time around. I actually already have a cheap Android box connected to my TV. It is controlled by a wireless mouse and works wonderfully. The support for streaming services, including local variants widely exceeds competitors such as Apple TV and Roku (and Google’s own Chromecast for that matter). If theres an Android app for it, it works on my TV.
The new version of Android was on display with new functions and an updated “material” look which will be used throughout Android, Google’s web services and chrome OS.
In the future, Android apps will run on Chromebooks. Neat.
More info on Android Wear with third party apps and a new smartwatch from Samsung. LG’s G Watch with Android Wear goes on sale today, so we’ll soon know more how these things work in real life.
Users will be able to mirror their Android devices on Chromecast sticks. About time.
The keynote was interrupted by two different protesters. The first one was about housing evictions and the other one was about killer robots. Call me nuts, but I really hate the idea of killer robots.
The company also presented Android Auto which is Google’s take on a connected car infotainment system.
Google Fit is a health metric and training tracking platform which will be built-in the next version of Android.
A new Cardboard app will enable Android devices to be a VR headset screen together with a DIY cardboard viewer. Virtual Reality on a budget.
digithoughts:

Google I/O keynote round-up
There was a lot of interesting news and info coming out of today’s Google I/O event. In short, Google is trying hard to play an increasing part of our lives - on the web, in our computers, phones, watches, glasses, TVs and even in our cars.
Android One is a Google Play Edition program for cheap phones. Cheap phones with clean Android sounds nice.
Android TV is official. Is the third time a charm for Android to get into our living rooms? With increased attention to gaming this time around. I actually already have a cheap Android box connected to my TV. It is controlled by a wireless mouse and works wonderfully. The support for streaming services, including local variants widely exceeds competitors such as Apple TV and Roku (and Google’s own Chromecast for that matter). If theres an Android app for it, it works on my TV.
The new version of Android was on display with new functions and an updated “material” look which will be used throughout Android, Google’s web services and chrome OS.
In the future, Android apps will run on Chromebooks. Neat.
More info on Android Wear with third party apps and a new smartwatch from Samsung. LG’s G Watch with Android Wear goes on sale today, so we’ll soon know more how these things work in real life.
Users will be able to mirror their Android devices on Chromecast sticks. About time.
The keynote was interrupted by two different protesters. The first one was about housing evictions and the other one was about killer robots. Call me nuts, but I really hate the idea of killer robots.
The company also presented Android Auto which is Google’s take on a connected car infotainment system.
Google Fit is a health metric and training tracking platform which will be built-in the next version of Android.
A new Cardboard app will enable Android devices to be a VR headset screen together with a DIY cardboard viewer. Virtual Reality on a budget.

digithoughts:

Google I/O keynote round-up

There was a lot of interesting news and info coming out of today’s Google I/O event. In short, Google is trying hard to play an increasing part of our lives - on the web, in our computers, phones, watches, glasses, TVs and even in our cars.

  • Android One is a Google Play Edition program for cheap phones. Cheap phones with clean Android sounds nice.
  • Android TV is official. Is the third time a charm for Android to get into our living rooms? With increased attention to gaming this time around. I actually already have a cheap Android box connected to my TV. It is controlled by a wireless mouse and works wonderfully. The support for streaming services, including local variants widely exceeds competitors such as Apple TV and Roku (and Google’s own Chromecast for that matter). If theres an Android app for it, it works on my TV.
  • The new version of Android was on display with new functions and an updated “material” look which will be used throughout Android, Google’s web services and chrome OS.
  • In the future, Android apps will run on Chromebooks. Neat.
  • More info on Android Wear with third party apps and a new smartwatch from Samsung. LG’s G Watch with Android Wear goes on sale today, so we’ll soon know more how these things work in real life.
  • Users will be able to mirror their Android devices on Chromecast sticks. About time.
  • The keynote was interrupted by two different protesters. The first one was about housing evictions and the other one was about killer robots. Call me nuts, but I really hate the idea of killer robots.
  • The company also presented Android Auto which is Google’s take on a connected car infotainment system.
  • Google Fit is a health metric and training tracking platform which will be built-in the next version of Android.
  • A new Cardboard app will enable Android devices to be a VR headset screen together with a DIY cardboard viewer. Virtual Reality on a budget.
Nap view #mtk
Nap view #mtk

Nap view #mtk

One helluva week

Ever have one of those weeks when life teaches you all this profound stuff?

On Tuesday, we buried my grandmother in a military cemetery in Fayetteville, Arkansas. I watched my father, a stoic man by all accounts, place his hand on the casket, head dropped and heart aching. I spent the afternoon imbibing with my parents and extended family, telling stories about her amazing life that was just one month short of a hundred years long.

On Wednesday, back in New York City, I dropped in on the last class my two-year-old was taking at the local YMCA. She was so happy to see me and proud that I showed up that she leapt into my arms, then held my hand and paraded me around the room to show her friends that papa had come to visit. It was simply awesome. Why hadn’t I done this more often?

This morning my wife and I were special guests at our four-year-old daughter’s class. My wife baked cookies and I read a story to the class with my daughter sitting in my lap. The story was about a duck and a goose who take an adventurous walk to the beach, apropos because our two daughters call our family trips to the beach “adventures”.

Life is one big, long adventure, ain’t it? There are ups and downs, unexpected triumphs and inevitable heartaches. Sometimes life condenses that stuff all into one week. 

#mtk (at Montauk End Of The World)
#mtk (at Montauk End Of The World)

#mtk (at Montauk End Of The World)